CHAPTER IV. Part B - Pages 41-46

 

 

1880 HISTORY OF LIVINGSTON COUNTY MICHIGAN

41.

was adopted, which then and since that time has been signed by the following-named physicians, as members of the association, viz.:(re-alphabetized by webmaster.)

A. S. Austin Fowlerville
George O. Austin Fowlerville
Casper V. Beebe Howell
Charles F. Bennett South Lyon
Andrew Blanck Howell
James A. Brown Fowlerville
William Caldwell Byron
Aaron W. Cooper Fowlerville
Charles G. Cruickshank Howell
Samuel DuBois Unadilla.
William H. Erwin Oak Grove
Isaiah Goodno Oak Grove
Leslie M. Goodrich Unadilla
Alexander D. Hagadorn Milford
William M. Hayford Hartland
Charles W. Haze Pinckney
Horace R. Hitchcock Howell
David L. Howes South Lyon
Robert C. Hutton Howell
Jesse G. Lindsley Highland
Z. Hawley Marsh Howell
Cyrus Mather Howell
William J. McHench Brighton
Richard Murphy Hartland
Henry P. Seymour Byron
Hollis F. Sigler Pinckney
Robert B. Smith Le Roy
Henry N. Spencer Howell
Orson W. Tock Gaines
William L. Wells Howell
Cutting B. Wiley Brighton

The honorary members are as follows:

Edward S. Dunster Ann Arbor
John.W. Langley Ann Arbor
Donald McLean Ann Arbor
Theodore McGraw Detroit

      The regular meetings of the association occur on the third Wednesdays of June, September, December, and March. The annual meeting is held in June each year at Howell. Other meetings are held alternately with Brighton and Fowlerville.

     The present officers of the association are as follows:

William H. Hayford of Hartland, President
Abel S. Austin of Fowlerville, Vice-President
R. C. Hutton of Howell, Secretary
Z. Hawley Marsh of Howell, Treasurer


THE LEGAL PROFESSION
EARLY LAWYERS OF THE COUNTY


       The first attorney who established in the business of his profession in Livingston County was James W. Stansbury, who came to Livingston County in 1837, locating as an attorney in the village of Pinckney. In  November, 1836, he was elected judge of probate, succeeding Kinsley S. Bingham in that office. It was under him that the first business of the Probate Court was done at Pinckney, where it was always held during his term of office. Mr. Stansbury, though never regarded as a very able lawyer, was quite literary in his tastes and acquirements, and stood well in the community as an honest and trustworthy man. About 1850 he removed from Pinckney to Ithaca, New York. He is now living in Danville, Illinois.

     Wellington A. Glover, the earliest of Howell's attorneys, settled in that village in 1833, and opened his office in the rear of Edward F. Gay's store. He was a fair lawyer, but never acquired a very lucrative business here. In politics he was strongly Whig, and it has been thought by some that his business might have been more prosperous if he bad been politically with the dominant party in Livingston. His Whig principles, however, secured for him the postmastership of Howell under the Harrison administration in the spring of 1841. He also held, by appointment, the office of prosecuting attorney of Livingston County at about the same time. He died in Howell in 1843.

     Daniel C. Marsh located as an attorney in Brighton in 1839, and was appointed prosecuting attorney of Livingston County in 1841. He is still living in Brighton, but has retired from the practice of his profession.

     Josiah Turner, a native of Vermont, who had emigrated from that State to Michigan, and stopped for a time in Ann Arbor, came from that place to Livingston County, and established as an attorney, at Howell, in 1840. Since that time he has been almost constantly in public office, though not by his own seeking. Immediately after his arrival in Howell, he was made master in chancery, and at the commencement of the following year assumed and performed the duties of county clerk, though nominally the deputy of Jesse Mapes, who had been elected to the office. In February, 1842, Mr. Turner was appointed by the court to the office of clerk, to fill the term of Mr. Mapes, who resigned at that time. In November, of that year, he was elected to the same office and was re-elected in 1844. In November, 1846, he was elected county judge, and re-elected in 1850. During these eight or ten years immediately following his settlement in Howell, besides attending to the duties of his offices, and also being at different times engaged in mercantile ventures, he kept up the business of his profession, and steadily prospered in it. He was elected judge of probate in 1856. In

42.

1880 HISTORY OF LIVINGSTON COUNTY MICHIGAN

 

May, 1857, he was appointed judge of the Supreme Court, and in the following November was elected circuit judge of the Seventh judicial Circuit, which office he has held (by re-election in 1863, 1869, and 1875) until the present time. The popularity of Judge Turner in the county of his adoption is shown by the fact that at the time of his re-election, in 1869, he received three thousand four hundred and eighty-nine votes, out of a total of three thousand five hundred and sixty-nine cast in Livingston for that office; and again, in 1875, he received four thousand two hundred and forty-seven votes out of the four thousand two hundred and sixty cast in the county. In the year 1860, judge Turner removed from Howell to Owosso, Shiawassee County, as a more central point in his judicial circuit, and he still resides there.

     Frederick C. Whipple, a native of Connecticut, and a graduate of Union College, in New York, came to Michigan in 1840, and after a short stay in Ann Arbor came to Livingston County, where he was admitted to practice in May, 1841, and immediately established himself in his profession at Brighton. He was the first editor of the Livingston Courier, established in that village by Nicholas Sullivan, in 1843. In the year 1846 he removed to Howell, where he lived during the remainder of his brilliant professional career, in which he stood confessedly at the head of the bar of Livingston County, and was regarded as one of the best jury lawyers in the State of Michigan. He held the office of prosecuting attorney (by appointment) for several years, was elected judge of probate in 1848, re-elected in 1852, and was elected Circuit Court commissioner in 1868. He died in the township of OceoIa, on the twenty-second of March, 1872. Immediately after his death, the Howell Lodge, No. 38, F. and A. M. (of which he had been a member and a Past Master), adopted the following resolution:

     "Whereas, The all-wise Governor of the Universe has seen fit to call our brother, Frederick C. Whipple, late Past Master of this lodge, from this transitory world to his more immediate presence in His spiritual temple; therefore, be it

     "Resolved, That in this dispensation of Divine Providence we recognize the loss of one who was ever a generous and public-spirited citizen; an eminent lawyer; a kind husband and father, and a faithful friend; and whose early life and brilliant intellect gave promise of future greatness unsurpassed; and whose memory will linger long in the hearts of his neighbors, acquaintances, and friends."

     George W. Peck commenced business as an attorney, in Brighton, in 1842, and in that or the following year entered into a law partnership with F. C. Whipple. Mr.
  Peck was elected and served as representative in the Michigan Legislature of 1846, and as representative in the Thirty-fourth Congress in 1855-57. He was a good talker, and very effective before a jury, but was not a profound lawyer. The profession was distasteful to him, and in the year 1847 he abandoned it, and afterwards removed to Lansing. He is now connected, in some capacity, with a coal-mining enterprise in Missouri.

     Lauren K. Hewett came from Washtenaw County to Howell, in May, 1842. He never ranked high as a lawyer. In 1857 he removed hence to Lansing, where he engaged in banking business, at which he was not more successful than he had been in the law.

     Lewis H. Hewett, then a lawyer of Ann Arbor, was admitted to practice in the courts of Livingston County, in November, 1839, and about four years later located as an attorney in Howell, where, in partnership with his brother, be formed the law firm of L. H. and. L. K. Hewett. L. H. Hewett succeeded F. C. Whipple as editor of the Livingston Courier, on its removal to Howell, in 1843. He was a fair lawyer, though careless and desultory in his methods. After five years stay in Howell he removed to Detroit, where he died suddenly.

     Richard B. Hall located in Howell, in 1843. He held the office of justice of the peace and some minor offices during his stay here, and left in 1848. He was what is known as a good fellow, told good stories, and was quick at repartee, but no more than ordinary as a lawyer. He is now a detective officer in California.



     James H. Ackerson also located in Howell in 1843, and remained there about five years, during which time he was once or twice elected justice of the peace, but it does not appear that he ever stood high in his profession, The Hon. J. W. Turner, in an address before the Pioneer Society, thus mentions him:

     "At an early day there lived in Howell a lawyer named Ackerson, who at one time, I believe, boarded at Benjamin J. Spring's hotel. It was supposed by many that Ackerson would not hesitate, in a pinch, to use all the arts of a pettifogger. And, indeed, on one occasion, a man who was really guilty, but who was arrested for larceny on a defective warrant, got the privilege from the arresting officer to come down from the country and see Ackerson before he appeared to answer to the charge. His attorney of course discovered the invalidity of the process and arranged that he would come out and break down the papers for a consideration, as well as 'run off' the defendant before another paper could be issued. Of course,

 

1880 HISTORY OF LIVINGSTON COUNTY MICHIGAN

43.

when Ackerson went out to attend the suit, he rode one horse and led another; and some one who remarked his leaving town in that manner, spoke to Spring about it some time during the same day. Spring's reply was that Ackerson does a law and livery business both!" Mr. Ackerson removed from Howell in the spring of 1848, and returned to the State of New York.

     John B. Dillingham commenced the practice of, the law in Howell in or about 1845, and remained here until about 1859, when he removed to, East Saginaw. He held the office of prosecuting attorney of Livingston County for the term succeeding the election of 1856. He was a man of large heart and a good lawyer. He died in Howell, while on a visit, or business trip here, from Saginaw.

     Justin Lawyer settled at the county-seat as an attorney in 1846. He remained here but a few years, and removed to Union City, Branch County, Michigan. He now resides in the city of Coldwater.

     Charles C. Ellsworth came from Vermont in 1846, and commenced reading law in the office of judge Turner. He was admitted to the bar in 1848, and, having married a daughter of Mr. Edward F. Gay, of Howell, removed to Greenville,
Montcalm County, Michigan, in 1851. He is a lawyer of excellent ability, and was elected to represent the district in which he resides, in the Forty-fifth Congress.

     Another of the law students of Judge Turner was John F. Farnsworth, who read in his office in 1842-43. He was never a member of the Livingston bar, but removed to St. Charles, Illinois, where he established himself in the profession, and has since served in Congress as representative from that district.

     William A. Clark commenced the practice of the law in Brighton, about 1848. He Was elected prosecuting attorney of Livingston County in 1850
(being the first who filled that office by election), and was re-elected in 1852, about which time he removed to Howell. Some twelve to fifteen years later he removed to Saginaw City.

     Henry H. Harmon was a teacher in the Howell schools in the winter of 1847-48. After the close of his term, in the spring of the latter year, he commenced reading law in the office Of Lewis H. Hewett, and was admitted in 1849. He was elected Circuit Court commissioner in 1852, prosecuting attorney in 1854, and judge of probate in 1864. He has accumulated a comfortable fortune in the profession, and is still in practice in Howell.

     Mylo L. Gay, read law "in the office of F. C. Whipple, and was admitted to the bar
  in 1853, but has never practiced in the courts. He is now a banker at Fowlerville, but resides in Howell.

     Marcus B. Wilcox was a lawyer of fine ability, an excellent and affable gentleman, and an upright man, against whom no word of reproach could ever be truly spoken. He was established in the practice of his profession at Pinckney soon after 1850, but afterwards moved to Howell. He was elected to the office of prosecuting attorney in 1860, and again in 1866. Soon after the close of his term he died in Howell village.

     Sardis F. Hubbell, although the first law student in Livingston County (in the office of Wellington A. Glover, in 1840-41), did not commence practice here until fourteen years later. He completed his studies with Hon. A. C. Baldwin, at Milford, Oakland County, and was admitted to the bar in that county in December, 1846. He then practiced for eight years in Oakland, and removed thence to Howell, in the spring of 1854. He was elected Circuit Court commissioner in the same year, and to the office of prosecuting attorney in 1858, 1862, and 1864. He is still a resident in Howell, and engaged in the profession which has given him a competence.

     Andrew D. Waddell, a native of Steuben County, New York, came in childhood with his parents to settle in Howell township, but on the death of his father, in 1837, returned with the family to New York, where, after reaching maturity, he commenced the study of the law. In 1855 he returned to Howell, completed his reading in the office of John B. Dillingham, and was admitted to practice by judge Sanford M. Green, in October, 1856. One month after his admission he was elected Circuit Court commissioner, and was again elected to the same office in 1860. In 1872 he was elected prosecuting attorney, and re-elected in 1874. He now resides in Howell, and is one of the most prominent members of the Livingston bar.

     Jerome W. Turner was only about three years old when he came with his father, judge Josiah Turner, to settle in Livingston County. Passing the years of his childhood and youth "principally in Howell he commenced the study of the law at an early age, was admitted to the bar in March, 1857, and commenced business with, Judge Frederick C. Whipple. After a year or two of practice in Howell, he removed to Corunna, Shiawassee County, and was there re-elected to the State Senate in November, 1868. In 1871 he removed to Owosso, where he still resides. Mr. Turner is ranked among the best lawyers of the State of Michigan.

     The foregoing mention of early attorneys intended

44.

1880 HISTORY OF LIVINGSTON COUNTY MICHIGAN

 

to include those who were located in business in the county during a period of twenty years from its organization -- is based on information obtained from judge Turner and others, who are necessarily well acquainted with the subject.


THE PRESENT BAR OF LIVINGSTON

     The, bar of Livingston County at the present time is composed of the following-named gentlemen, viz.:(re-alphabetized by webmaster)

P. V. M. Botsford Oceola
B. F. Button Fowlerville
B. T. O. Clark Brighton
Hugh Conklin Howell
John Conner Fowlerville
A. D. Cruickshank Fowlerville
J. T. Eaman Pinckney
H. H. Harmon Howell
H. F. Higgins Fowlerville
S. F. Hubbell Howell
L. S. Montague Howell
Rollin H. Person Howell
Dennis Shields Howell
T. R. Shields Pinckney
J. I. VanKeuren Oceola
A. D. Waddell Howell
F. H. Warren Fowlerville


LIVINGSTON CIVIL LIST

     In this list the names are given of those persons who have held county offices in Livingston; and also of citizens of the county who have held important offices in or under the State or national government.


UNITED STATES SENATOR

Kinsley S. Bingham
elected in 1859; died at Green Oak, October 5, 1861


GOVERNOR OF MICHIGAN

Kinsley S. Bingham
first inauguration January 3, 1855
second inauguration January,7, 1857


JUDGE OF THE SUPREME COURT

Josiah Turner
appointed May 9, 1857
served on Supreme Bench until January 1, 1858


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS

Kinsley S. Bingham, elected in 1846; re-elected in 1848


PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORS

George W. Lee, 1860

Samuel G. Ives, 1872


DELEGATE TO FIRST CONVENTION OF ASSENT*

Elnathan Noble


DELEGATES TO SECOND CONVENTION OF ASSENT µ

George W. Jewett
Stoddard W. Twichell
Solomon Sutherland


*Convened at Ann Arbor, September 26, 1836.
µConvened at Ann Arbor December 14, 1836.

 

DELEGATES TO CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION OF 1850 ¤

Daniel S. Lee
Robert Warden Jr.
Robert Crouse
Ely Barnard


DELEGATES TO
CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION OF 1867±

Benjamin W. Lawrence

Edwin B. Winans


MEMBER OF
CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION OF 1873 §

Ira D.Crouse


STATE SENATORS

Edward M. Cust Hamburg elected in
November, 1841
re-elected in 1842, 1843,¥ and 1844
Charles P. Bush, Genoa elected in
November, 1845
re-elected in 1846.¶
Nelson G. Isbell elected in
November, 1847
re-elected in 1848, 1849, and 1850
William McCauley, Brighton elected in
November, 1852
John Kenyon, Jr., Tyrone elected in
November, 1854
Marcus B. Wilcox, Putnam elected in
November, 1856
Robert Crouse, Hartland elected in
November, 1858
John H. Galloway, Howell elected in
November, 1860
William A. Clark, Howell elected in
November, 1862
David L. LaTourette, Tyrone elected in
November, 1866
Mylo L. Gay, Howell elected in
November, 1870
Charles M. Wood, Pinckney elected in
November, 1874
Horace Halbert, Conway elected in
November, 1878


SPEAKERS OF
THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Kinsley S. Bingham,
Green Oak
1838, 1939, and 1842
George W. Peck,
Brighton, 1847


REPRESENTATIVES IN THE
LEGISLATURE OF MICHIGAN

Second State Legislature
convened January 2, 1837

Kinsley S. Bingham, Green Oak
Third State Legislature
convened January 1, 1838

Kins S. Bingham, Green Oak
Flavius J. B. Crane, Howell

Fourth State Legislature
convened January 7, 1839

Kinsley S. Bingham
Ira Jennings
Green Oak


¤ Convened at Lansing, June 3.
± Convened at Lansing, May 15
§ Convened at Lansing, August 27.
¥ President of the Senate pro tempore January 1, 1844.
¶ President of the Senate pro tempore January 30, 1847.

 

1880 HISTORY OF LIVINGSTON COUNTY MICHIGAN

45.

Fifth State Legislature
convened January 6, 1840

Charles P. Bush, Genoa

Sixth State Legislature
convened January 4, 1841

Kinsley S. Bingham Green Oak
Charles P. Bush, Genoa

Seventh State Legislature
convened January 3, 1842

Kinsley S. Bingham Green Oak
Charles P. Bush, Genoa

Eighth State Legislature
convened January 2, 1843

Ely Barnard
Charles P. Bush
Genoa

Ninth State Legislature
convened January 1, 1844

EIy Barnard, Genoa
Robert D. Power, Brighton
Tenth State Legislature
convened January 6, 1845

Robert D. Power, Brighton
Ralph Fowler, Handy
Eleventh State Legislature
convened January 5, 1846

George W. Peck, Brighton
Washington Wing, losco
Twelfth Legislature
convened January 4, 1847

George W. Peck, Ira Jennings, Brighton
Thirteenth State Legislature
convened January 3, 1848

Robert Crouse, Hartland
Chester Hazard, Genoa
Fourteenth Legislature
convened January 1, 1849

Bradford Campbell, Brighton
Joseph L. Hartsuff, Unadilla
Fifteenth State Legislature
convened January 7, 1850

John Kenyon, Jr., Tyrone
George W. Kneeland, Howell
Sixteenth State Legislature
convened February 5, 1850
Spaulding M. Case, Brighton
Ralph Fowler, Handy
Seventeenth State Legislature
convened January 5, 1853
(First Legislature chosen under apportionment prescribed by the constitution of 1850)
James Gleason, Hartland
Charles W. Haze, Putnam
Eighteenth State Legislature
convened January 3, 1855

Samuel G. Ives, Unadilla Charles A. Wilber, Howell
Nineteenth State Legislature
convened January 7, 1857

Samuel G. Ives, Unadilla
John How, Deer Creek
Twentieth State Legislature
convened January 5, 1859

David Bush, Handy
John Gilluly, Brighton
Twenty-first State Legislature
convened January 2, 1861

Jacob Kanouse, Cohoctah
Edwin B. Winans, Hamburg
Twenty-second State Legislature
convened January 7, 1863

Henry H. Harmon, Howell Edwin B. Winans, Hamburg
Twenty-third State Legislature
convened January 4, 1865

David G. Colwell, Tyrone
William Ball, Hamburg
Twenty-fourth State Legislature
convened January 2, 1867

William Ball, Hamburg
Alexander H. Benedict, Handy
Twenty-fifth State Legislature
convened January 6, 1869

Mylo L. Gay, Howell
James B. Lee, Brighton
Twenty-sixth  State Legislature
convened January 4, 1871

George W. Crofoot, Putnam
Giles Ross, Hartland
Twenty-seventh State Legislature
convened January 1, 1873

W. Dinturff, Handy
John Carter, Brighton
Twenty-eighth State Legislature
convened January 6, 1875

Louis Meyer, Brighton
Isaac Stow, losco

Twenty-ninth State Legislature
convened January 3, 1877

Giles Ross, Hartland

 

Thirtieth State Legislature
convened January, 1879

Thompson Grimes, Pinckney


CIRCUIT JUDGE

Josiah Turner, elected in November, 1857; re-elected in 1863; again in 1869; and for a fourth term in 1875


COUNTY JUDGE

Josiah Turner, elected in November, 1846; re-elected in November, 1850


SECOND JUDGES

John Kenyon, Jr.
elected in November, 1846; resigned in 1849
W. R. Cobb
elected in November, 1849, to fill vacancy occasioned by the resignation of John Kenyon
Leland Walker
elected in November, 1850


ASSOCIATE JUDGES

Elisha W. Brockway
Elnathan Noble
elected in 1836
Solomon Sutherland
Elisha W. Brockway
in office from 1838 to 1840, inclusive
William A. Buckland
Charles D. Topping
elected in November, 1840
William McCauley
Alonzo Slayton
elected in November, 1844


JUDGES OF PROBATE

Kinsley S. Bingham
elected in May, 1836;
qualified July 15, 1836
James W. Stansbury
elected in November, 1836
George W. Kneeland
elected in November, 1840;
re-elected in November, 1844
Frederick C. Whipple
elected in November, 1848
re-elected in November, 1852
Josiah Turner
elected in November, 1856;
resigned May 9, 1857,
having been appointed circuit judge
Ira P. Bingham
appointed May, 1857, to fill vacancy occasioned by the
resignation of Judge Turner
Ira P. Bingham
elected in November, 1860
Henry H. Harmon
elected in November, 1864
Henry N. Spencer
elected in November, 1868
Jacob Kanouse
elected in November, 1872
Edwin B. Winans
elected in November, 1876


SHERIFFS

Justus J. Bennett
elected in May, 1836
William Tompkins
elected in November, 1837
Robert D. Power
elected in November, 1838;
re-elected in November, 1840
Richard P. Bush
elected in November, 1842;
re-elected in November, 1844
William E. Huntley
elected in November, 1846;
re-elected in November, 1848
Edward Bishop
elected in November, 1850;
re-elected in November, 1852

46.

1880 HISTORY OF LIVINGSTON COUNTY MICHIGAN

 

Van Rensselaer T. Angel
elected in November, 1854;
re-elected in November, 1856
John A. Tanner
elected in November, 1858
Henry Hartman
elected in November, 1860;
re-elected in November, 1862
Giles Tucker
elected in November, 1864
John G. Gould
elected in November, 1866
Elisha E. Hazard
elected in November, 1868;
re-elected in November, 1870
William Goodrich
elected in November, 1872;
re-elected in November, 1874
Charles E. Beurman
elected in November, 1876;
re-elected in November, 1878


COUNTY CLERKS

Flavius J. B. Crane
elected in May, 1836;
re-elected in November, 1836
Philester Jessup
elected in November, 1837, (Under Mr. Jessup the business of the office was chiefly done by
Ely Barnard, deputy clerk)
Almon Whipple
elected in November, 1838. (The deputy clerk under Mr. Whipple was George W. Jewett, who performed the duties of the office during the first half of Mr. Whipple's incumbency, and a portion of them afterwards.)
Jesse Mapes
elected in November, 1840. (During all of Mr. Mapes' term the duties of the office were performed by his deputy clerk, Josiah Turner, now judge of the Seventh judicial Circuit.) Mr. Mapes resigned in February, 1842.
Josiah Turner
appointed by the Circuit Court, February 18, 1842, to fill the vacancy caused by resignation of Jesse Mapes; elected in November, 1842;
re-elected in November, 1844
Elijah F. Burt
elected in November, 1846;
re-elected in November, 1848
Daniel D. T. Chandler
elected in November, 1850;
re-elected in November, 1852
Abel F. Butterfield
elected in November, 1854;
re-elected in November, 1856
Neil O'Hearn
elected in November, 1858
Elisha W. Grant
elected in November, 1860
William, R. Cobb
elected in November, 1862
Orin H. Winegar
elected in November, 1864
Solomon T. Lyon
elected in November, 1866
Albert L. Hathaway
elected in November, 1868;
re-elected in November, 1870
Benjamin F. Batcheler
elected in November, 1872;
re-elected in November, 1874
Halsted Gregory
elected in November, 1876
Newton T. Kirk
elected in November, 1878


REGISTERS OF DEEDS

Ely Barnard
elected in May, 1836; continued in office, by re-election,
from 1836 to 1840, inclusive
George W. Jewett
elected in November, 1840
Derastus Hinman
elected in November, 1842
re-elected in November, 1844
William C. Rumsey
elected in November, 1846;
re-elected in November, 1848

 

Register of Deeds
cont.
Levi D. Smith
elected in November, 1850;
re-elected in November, 1852;
  re-elected in November, 1854;    re-elected in November, 1856
Amos S. Adams
elected in November, 1858
William Williamson
elected in November 1860;
re-elected in November, 1862
Neil O'Hearn
elected in November, 1864;
re-elected in November, 1866
Harry J. Haven
elected in November, 1868;
re-elected in November, 1870
William E. Watson
elected in November, 1872;
re-elected in November, 1874
William M. Beach
elected in November, 1876;
re-elected in November, 1878


COUNTY TREASURERS.

Amos Adams
elected in May, 1836
George W. Jewett
elected in November, 1838
Almon Whipple
elected in November, 1840
Chester Hazard
elected in November, 1842;
re-elected in November, 1844
Richard P. Bush
elected in November, 1846
James M. Murray
elected in November, 1848;
re-elected in November, 1850
Charles Benedict
elected in November, 1852;
re-elected in November, 1854
Henry Hartman
elected in November, 1856;
re-elected in November, 1858
Ira Knight
elected in November, 1860
William C. Rumsey
elected in November, 1862;
re-elected in November, 1864
Albert Riddle
elected in November, 1866;
re-elected in November, 1868
Ira O. Marble
elected in November, 1870
Horace Halbert
elected in November, 1872;
re-elected in November, 1874
William R. Miller
elected in November, 1876;
re-elected in November, 1878


PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS

     The first prosecuting attorney for Livingston County was James Kingsley, of Ann Arbor, who was  appointed as such by the court, for the first term; held in Livingston, November, 1837. Those who held the office by appointment during the period from 1837 to 1850 (when it became elective) were the following-named persons, viz.:*

Wellington A. Glover
Daniel C. Marsh
Lewis H. Hewett
Frederick C. Whipple
Charles C. Ellsworth

     The list of prosecuting attorneys who have held the office by election is as follows:

William A. Clark
elected in November, 1850;
re-elected in November, 1852


*This list is furnished by judge Turner, who is unable to give from memory the dates and duration of their respective terms of service.

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