Timothy Galloway


Born: 14 May 1803
Died: 24 Feb 1890

Father: Thomas D. Galloway
Mother:   Ruth Mapes

Brothers:
James Galloway 
Thomas Galloway 
John Galloway
Alexander Galloway  
Gilbert Galloway

Sisters:
Jerusha Galloway 
Mary Galloway
Ruth Ann Galloway 
Rebecca Galloway 
Catherine Galloway
Sarah Galloway  
Sarah Galloway

Married:  Elsie Ball 1829 in Monroe, NY
Children:
Hudson McFarland Galloway
Elizabeth Jane Galloway, born 22 Ju11831; died 23 Aug 1913
Thomas G. Galloway 
Jane Galloway, born 1832; died 1913. 
Robert F. Galloway
Silas D. Galloway
George W. Galloway
Smith Galloway
Ann Augusta Galloway, born 31 May 1851; died aft. 1929.
Frances Galloway

"Frederick W. Bentley leaves this record ofhis meeting Ann Augusta Galloway (1851 -1929) in Momoe, NY, shortly before she died and quotes her, below.
     " And here back of the Church on James Street, I was directed by the Postmistress to the oldest inhabitant, also in this neighborhood, the last descendant of Lieutenant James
to bear the Galloway name, Ann Augusta aged 80 with a mind as clear as a bell and everything at her tongues ~nd. We spent half the afternoon, I writing as fast as she talked,
of the corning of the Galloways across the sea with a King's grant of Arms. Leaving behind a fortune because of religious troubles. Of her remembrances of the old
homestead back on the hill near the lake. How her grandfather and his brothers helped clear the land for miles, as the Galloways owned much of this part of the valley.
     And this is the first impression I had from my mountain view; land long cleared for farming, rolling fields spreading up the mountain. Testifying to generations of concerted,
fierce labor. Her Great Grandfather, the Lieutenant James, had the famous nearby Smithy where he forged part of the second great chain and with his ox team is depicted,
accompanied his son age ten, carting the chain to the Hudson in a picture she has seen hanging as one enters the door of Washington's headquarters at Newburgh.
     The Galloways as she knew their men were primarily fighters. They loved to go to war. Her three brothers went through the Civil War unscathed. With all they were noted
for kindheartedness and gentleness, sometimes melancholy, not always rugged. Though she herself has the traditional Highland giant size of limb. Her father's "Timothy of
Turners," quoted in the History of Orange County, Bible lay before me from which to copy the large family. All married, all dead except herself, "neither married nor dead, just
fossilized" as she said. She insists her name be Gus, the other "too long for tombstones." She owns her house but retains but two rooms aloft, "her Hermitage." Her mother, a Ball,
was a descendant of George Washington's mother and she is entitled to vast millions on that side if some lawyer could return the ancestral property at Castle Stevens now
occupied by the railroad company who refuse to show any mortal eyes their papers. She is content and happy as she looks across the scenes ofher men's endeavors. Yet she asks
me as I go "Were the Galloways a myth?"1
1Paul Galloway